Birds That Start With E

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Birds That Start With E

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The symphony of nature is alive with the chirrups, calls, and songs of birds, each with its unique story and character. Among this vast choir, those whose names commence with the letter ‘E’ hold a special allure.

Join us as we embark on an exploration into the world of these eloquent aviators, unveiling the elegance and enigma they add to our planet’s avian tapestry.

List of Birds That Start with The Letter E in US

Eastern Bluebird
Eastern Kingbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Eastern Phoebe
Eastern Screech-Owl
Eastern Towhee
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Eastern Yellow Wagtail
Eared Grebe
Elegant Tern
Evening Grosbeak
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Eurasian Wigeon
European Starling
Elf Owl
Eurasian Skylark (rarer in the U.S. but has been spotted)
Eurasian Tree Sparrow
Eurasian Jackdaw (a rare vagrant)
Eurasian Nuthatch (another rare vagrant)

Eastern Bluebird

The Eastern Bluebird is a beloved songbird, recognized by its bright blue back and rusty chest. Appearance: Males have vibrant blue upperparts with an orange-red breast, while females are a duller blue-gray. Diet: They feed mainly on insects, but also eat fruits in colder months. Reproduction: They nest in cavities and birdhouses, laying 4-6 eggs.

Eastern Kingbird

A confident bird of open areas, it’s known for its bold behavior. Appearance: They are primarily blackish-gray with a white underbelly and a distinctive white tail-tip. Diet: Feeds mainly on flying insects. Reproduction: They build cup-shaped nests on tree branches, laying 3-5 eggs.

Eastern Meadowlark

Famous for its flutelike song, it’s seen in grasslands across the East. Appearance: Bright yellow front with a black V on the chest and streaky brown back. Diet: Seeds and insects. Reproduction: Nests on the ground in grassy areas, laying 3-5 eggs.

Eastern Phoebe

A familiar flycatcher that often nests around human-made structures. Appearance: Grayish-brown birds with a soft voice and habit of tail-wagging. Diet: Primarily flying insects. Reproduction: Builds nests under eaves or bridges, laying about 4-6 eggs.

Eastern Screech-Owl

A small owl known for its trilling calls. Appearance: Comes in gray and reddish-brown morphs, with intricate patterns and tufted ears. Diet: Small mammals, birds, and insects. Reproduction: Nests in tree cavities or nest boxes, laying 3-5 eggs.

Eastern Towhee

Often heard before it’s seen, singing its “drink-your-tea” song. Appearance: Males are black, white, and reddish-brown, while females are brown where males are black. Diet: Seeds, berries, and insects. Reproduction: Nests on the ground, laying 3-4 eggs.

Eastern Wood-Pewee

A woodland flycatcher recognized by its plaintive song. Appearance: Olive-gray above with whitish below and two wing bars. Diet: Catches flying insects mid-air. Reproduction: They build small cup nests on horizontal tree branches, laying 3-4 eggs.

Eastern Yellow Wagtail

A rare visitor to the western Alaskan coast from Asia. Appearance: Bright yellow underparts with olive-green back and a distinctive wagging tail behavior. Diet: Insects. Reproduction: Not commonly breeding in the U.S., but when they do, they nest on the ground, laying 4-6 eggs.

Eared Grebe

A small diving bird with striking breeding plumage. Appearance: Black and chestnut in breeding season with distinct “ear” tufts; duller in non-breeding plumage. Diet: Aquatic insects, crustaceans, and small fish. Reproduction: They build floating nests in marshy areas, laying 3-4 eggs.

Elegant Tern

A graceful seabird seen along the Pacific coast. Appearance: Slender with a long, drooping bill and a black cap. Diet: Small fish caught by diving. Reproduction: Nests in colonies on sand islands, laying one egg.

Evening Grosbeak

A bright and chunky finch of northern forests. Appearance: Yellow, white, and black with a large bill. Diet: Seeds, especially sunflower seeds. Reproduction: They nest in trees, laying 3-4 eggs.

Eurasian Collared-Dove

An introduced species now common in many U.S. areas. Appearance: Pale gray with a distinctive black crescent on the back of its neck. Diet: Seeds. Reproduction: Nests in trees or shrubs, laying 2 eggs.

Eurasian Wigeon

A visitor from across the Atlantic, often mingling with American wigeons. Appearance: Males have a reddish head, gray sides, and a black tail. Females are mottled brown. Diet: Aquatic plants and some insects. Reproduction: Rarely breeds in the U.S., but nests on the ground near water when it does, laying about 8-9 eggs.

European Starling

Introduced to the U.S., they’re now one of the most widespread birds. Appearance: Dark with a glossy sheen, and speckled in winter. Diet: Insects, fruits, and seeds. Reproduction: Nests in cavities, laying 4-6 eggs.

Elf Owl

The world’s lightest owl, common in the southwestern deserts. Appearance: Small and brown with white “eyebrows”. Diet: Insects and scorpions. Reproduction: Nests in tree cavities or abandoned woodpecker holes, laying 2-4 eggs.

Eurasian Skylark

Rare in the U.S., they’re known for their high, melodious song flights. Appearance: Brown, streaked birds with a small crest. Diet: Seeds and insects. Reproduction: Not commonly breeding in the U.S., but they nest on the ground, laying 3-5 eggs when they do.

Eurasian Tree Sparrow

Introduced to the U.S. and localized around St. Louis, MO. Appearance: Brown with a distinctive black spot on its white cheek. Diet: Seeds and some insects. Reproduction: Nests in cavities, laying 5-7 eggs.

Eurasian Jackdaw

A rare vagrant from Europe. Appearance: Small, grayish-black with a light gray neck and a pale eye. Diet: Omnivorous – eats grains, fruits, insects, and other small animals. Reproduction: Not breeding in the U.S.

Eurasian Nuthatch

Another rare vagrant from Europe. Appearance: Blue-gray above, buff below with a black eye stripe. Diet: Insects, seeds, and nuts. Reproduction: Not breeding in the U.S.

Birds that start with ABirds that start with BBirds that start with C
Birds that start with DBirds that start with EBirds that start with F
Birds that start with GBirds that start with HBirds that start with I
Birds that start with JBirds that start with KBirds that start with L
Birds that start with MBirds that start with NBirds that start with O
Birds that start with PBirds that start with QBirds that start with R
Birds that start with SBirds that start with TBirds that start with U
Birds that start with VBirds that start with WBirds that start with X

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