Birds That Start With W

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Birds That Start With W

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Whirling within the whirlwinds of our vast world, there’s a wondrous winged collective woven with the whimsy of the letter ‘W’. These whimsical wanderers, whether warbling or wading, weave a rich web of wild tales and wonders.

Waddle with us into the windswept wilds, as we unwrap the world of ‘W’-welcomed birds, revealing their wiles and winsome ways.

List of Birds Starting with the Letter W

  1. Western Bluebird
  2. Western Kingbird
  3. Western Meadowlark
  4. Western Grebe
  5. Western Wood-Pewee
  6. Western Tanager
  7. Western Sandpiper
  8. Western Gull
  9. Western Screech-Owl
  10. Western Yellow Wagtail
  11. Willet
  12. Wood Duck
  13. White-crowned Sparrow
  14. White-throated Sparrow
  15. White-breasted Nuthatch
  16. White-eyed Vireo
  17. White-winged Dove
  18. White-tailed Kite
  19. White-rumped Sandpiper
  20. Wilson’s Warbler
  21. Wilson’s Snipe
  22. Wilson’s Phalarope
  23. Wilson’s Storm-Petrel
  24. Wood Thrush
  25. Wood Stork
  26. Worm-eating Warbler
  27. Wrentit
  28. White-faced Ibis
  29. White-tailed Ptarmigan
  30. Whip-poor-will
  31. White-winged Scoter
  32. White Ibis
  33. Whooping Crane
  34. White-headed Woodpecker
  35. White Pelican

Western Tanager

The Western Tanager is a beautiful bird known for its vibrant colors. It has a black head with a yellow body and wings. The male has a vibrant red face, while the female has a duller yellow face. This bird has a sturdy build, with a length of about 7 inches and a wingspan of 9-10 inches. Overall, it is a visually striking bird that is easily recognizable.

When it comes to diet, the Western Tanager primarily feeds on insects during the breeding season. It is often seen foraging in trees, gleaning insects from leaves and branches. However, it also consumes fruits and berries when available. This bird has a varied diet that allows it to adapt to different food sources depending on the season.

In terms of habitat, the Western Tanager can be found in coniferous forests, particularly in mountainous regions. It prefers open areas with ample tree cover and is commonly found in the western parts of North America. During the breeding season, it can also be found further north in Canada.

When it comes to breeding and nesting habits, the Western Tanager typically builds its nest in the branches of tall trees. The female is primarily responsible for nest construction, using materials such as grass, moss, and bark strips. They often choose a well-hidden location to protect their eggs from predators. The female usually lays around 3-5 eggs, which she incubates for approximately 12-14 days. Both parents take turns feeding the hatchlings until they are ready to leave the nest, which usually happens after about 11-14 days.

Western Screech-Owl

The Western Screech-Owl is a small owl species with a distinct appearance. It has a rounded head with prominent ear tufts, bright yellow eyes, and a hooked beak. The owl’s coloring is mostly gray or brown, providing excellent camouflage in its natural environment. It measures about 8-10 inches in length, making it a relatively small owl species.

When it comes to feeding behaviors, the Western Screech-Owl is a nocturnal predator. It primarily feeds on small mammals, such as mice and voles, as well as insects and small birds. It hunts from a perch, relying on its excellent hearing and vision to locate prey. The owl silently swoops down on its target and captures it with its sharp talons.

The natural habitat of the Western Screech-Owl includes woodlands and forests, particularly those with dense vegetation and ample tree cover. It is commonly found in western parts of North America, from Canada to Mexico. This owl species prefers nesting in tree cavities or using abandoned nests of other birds.

In terms of mating and nesting patterns, the Western Screech-Owl usually forms pair bonds that last for several years. The male attracts the female with courtship calls and aerial displays. Once a pair bond is formed, they establish a territory together. The female lays about 2-5 eggs, which she incubates for approximately 26-32 days. Both parents take turns caring for the nest and feeding the hatchlings until they fledge after about 28-35 days.

White Stork

The White Stork is a large, graceful bird with a distinctive appearance. It has a white body with black flight feathers, long red legs, and a long, pointed beak. This bird has a wingspan of about 5-6 feet, making it an impressive sight when in flight. The White Stork is known for its elegant and majestic presence.

When it comes to food and feeding habits, the White Stork primarily feeds on small vertebrates, such as frogs, fish, and small mammals. It is also known to consume insects, worms, and other invertebrates. The stork forages by walking slowly through grasslands or shallow water, using its sharp beak to catch prey.

The common habitat of the White Stork includes wetlands, marshes, and grasslands. It is a migratory bird that breeds in Europe and western Asia, and winters in Africa. During the breeding season, the White Stork builds large nests made of sticks and vegetation, often on chimneys, poles, or other man-made structures.

When it comes to breeding and nesting patterns, the White Stork forms strong pair bonds that can last for several years. The nesting site is often reused each year, with both parents working together to maintain and repair the nest. The female usually lays around 2-6 eggs, which are incubated by both parents for about 30-33 days. Both parents take turns caring for the hatchlings and providing them with food until they fledge after approximately 60-65 days.

Wood Duck

The Wood Duck is a stunningly beautiful bird with unique features. It has a crested head, a colorful neck pattern, and vibrant plumage. The male Wood Duck has a glossy green head, a white stripe around the eye, and a reddish-brown breast. The female has a more subtle appearance, with a gray-brown body and a white teardrop-shaped eye patch. Both males and females have a long, pointed tail, which is characteristic of this species.

When it comes to dietary habits, the Wood Duck is an omnivorous bird. It feeds on a variety of foods, including aquatic plants, seeds, nuts, insects, and small fish. The duck typically forages in shallow water, using its bill to filter out small invertebrates and to collect plant matter.

The Wood Duck can be found in various habitats, including wooded swamps, marshes, and ponds. It prefers areas with ample trees for nesting and dense vegetation for cover. This duck species can be found in North America, particularly in the eastern parts of the continent.

In terms of nesting and breeding behaviors, the Wood Duck is known for its unique nesting habits. It often nests in tree hollows, particularly those created by large woodpeckers. It may also use man-made nesting boxes. The female lays around 6-15 eggs, which she incubates for about 30 days. Once the ducklings hatch, they leap from the nest and make their way to the water, where they are cared for by the female until they are capable of independent feeding and swimming.

Whistling Kite

The Whistling Kite is a bird of prey known for its distinctive appearance and whistling call. It has a wingspan of about 4-5 feet and a body length of approximately 18-22 inches. The kite has a dark brown or blackish-brown plumage, a white head, and a hooked beak. It has broad wings and a long tail, allowing it to soar effortlessly through the air.

When it comes to feeding habits, the Whistling Kite primarily preys on small mammals, such as rats, mice, and rabbits. It also consumes carrion and occasionally captures birds, reptiles, and amphibians. The kite uses its keen eyesight to locate prey from a high perch, and then swoops down to capture it with its sharp talons.

The Whistling Kite can be found in various habitats, including open woodlands, swamps, wetlands, and grassy areas. It is commonly found in Australia and New Guinea, where it is considered a familiar sight.

When it comes to breeding and nesting, the Whistling Kite builds a large nest made of sticks, usually in the canopy of tall trees. The female lays 2-3 eggs, which she incubates for about 35-40 days. Both parents take turns incubating the eggs and caring for the young until they are ready to leave the nest, which usually occurs after about 55-60 days.

Western Osprey

The Western Osprey, also known as the Fish Hawk, is a large bird of prey that specializes in catching fish. It has a wingspan of about 5-6 feet and a body length of approximately 2 feet. The osprey has a white head, with a dark line through the eye and a brown back. Its underside is mostly white, and it has sharp talons and a hooked beak.

When it comes to diet, the Western Osprey feeds almost exclusively on fish. It is a skilled hunter, plunging feet first into the water to catch its prey. It has specially adapted reversible outer toes and spiny scales on its feet that help it grip slippery fish. Once it catches a fish, the osprey carries it in its talons and flies to a nearby perch to eat.

The natural habitat of the Western Osprey includes coastal areas, lakes, rivers, and wetlands. It can be found in North America, particularly in western regions and along the coastlines.

In terms of mating and nesting habits, the Western Osprey often returns to the same nesting site each year. The nest is typically built in a large tree or on a man-made structure, such as a platform or utility pole. The female lays 2-4 eggs, which are incubated by both parents for approximately 35-40 days. Both parents take turns caring for the hatchlings and providing them with food until they fledge after about 50-55 days.

Whooper Swan

The Whooper Swan is a large, elegant bird with a distinctive appearance. It has a wingspan of about 7-8 feet and a body length of approximately 4-5 feet. The swan has a long neck and a graceful posture. It has a white plumage, with a black beak and feet. It also has a yellow patch in front of its eye.

When it comes to food habits, the Whooper Swan is an herbivorous bird. It mainly feeds on aquatic plants, such as waterweed, pondweeds, and grasses. It grazes in shallow water, tipping its body to reach the plants submerged below the surface. It may also feed on land, particularly when foraging for grasses and agricultural crops.

The common habitat of the Whooper Swan includes wetlands, lakes, and rivers. It breeds in the northern parts of Europe and Asia, and winters in milder climates in Europe and eastern Asia.

When it comes to breeding patterns, the Whooper Swan often forms long-term pair bonds. The nest is built on the ground, typically near water, using leaves, grass, and other plant materials. The female lays around 4-7 eggs, which are incubated by both parents for about 36-40 days. Once the cygnets hatch, they are cared for by both parents and remain with them until they are capable of independent feeding and flying, usually after about 4-5 months.

Willow Ptarmigan

The Willow Ptarmigan, also known simply as the Willow Grouse, is a medium-sized bird found in the northern parts of North America. It has a plump body, a short tail, and feathered legs to withstand the cold. The plumage of the Willow Ptarmigan changes with the seasons. During the winter, it is mostly white to blend in with the snowy landscape, while during the summer, it becomes brown to match the vegetation.

When it comes to eating habits, the Willow Ptarmigan primarily feeds on plant material. It consumes a variety of leaves, buds, shoots, flowers, berries, and seeds. It forages on the ground or in low shrubs, using its strong, pointed beak to pluck and eat plant parts.

The typical habitats of the Willow Ptarmigan include tundra, boreal forests, and alpine regions. It is well-adapted to cold climates and is often found in areas with a snowy or icy landscape.

In terms of breeding and nesting patterns, the Willow Ptarmigan forms pair bonds during the breeding season. The female nests on the ground, using a shallow depression lined with grass and feathers. She typically lays around 6-12 eggs, which she incubates for approximately 21-24 days. Once the chicks hatch, they are precocial, meaning they are capable of moving and feeding themselves shortly after hatching. They remain with the female for a few weeks until they are fully independent.

Wallcreeper

The Wallcreeper is a unique and elusive bird species found in the mountains of Eurasia. It has a small body, measuring about 6-7 inches in length, and its wingspan is around 11-12 inches. The bird has a mottled brown plumage with vibrant orange and black wings. Its beak is slender and slightly curved, allowing it to probe in narrow crevices for insects.

When it comes to feeding behaviors, the Wallcreeper is primarily an insectivorous bird. It feeds on insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates, often found on rocky surfaces or in crevices. It uses its specialized curved beak to extract prey from narrow gaps and cracks in the rocks.

The preferred habitat of the Wallcreeper includes rocky cliffs, mountainsides, and canyon walls. It is often found in habitats with ample vertical surfaces and abundant insect populations.

When it comes to breeding habits, the Wallcreeper typically nests in rock crevices or cliff ledges. The female constructs the nest by using materials such as moss, bark, and grass. She lays around 4-5 eggs, which she incubates for about 17-20 days. Both parents take turns caring for the hatchlings and providing them with food until they are capable of independent foraging and flying.

White-Eyed Vireo

The White-Eyed Vireo is a small songbird known for its distinctive appearance and vocal abilities. It has a plump body, a short tail, and a relatively large head. The bird has an olive-green plumage, with a white eye-ring that gives it its name. It also has white underparts and a yellowish throat. The White-Eyed Vireo measures about 4-5 inches in length and has a wingspan of approximately 7-9 inches.

When it comes to feeding behaviors, the White-Eyed Vireo is an insectivorous bird. It primarily feeds on insects, spiders, and caterpillars. It forages in trees and shrubs, gleaning insects from leaves and branches. It also eats berries and other small fruits when available.

The preferred habitat of the White-Eyed Vireo includes open woodlands, thickets, and shrubby areas. It can be found in southeastern parts of the United States and Mexico.

When it comes to nesting and breeding patterns, the White-Eyed Vireo builds a cup-shaped nest in shrubs or low trees. The female constructs the nest using grasses, twigs, and plant fibers, weaving them together to create a sturdy structure. She lays 3-5 eggs, which she incubates for approximately 12-14 days. Both parents take turns caring for the hatchlings and providing them with food until they are ready to leave the nest, which typically occurs after about 9-11 days.

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